January 13, 2013
by Jeff Quattrone
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Dragon Tongue Beans

dragon tounge beansQuite a bean if I say so myself. This 18th century Netherlands heirloom has never been manipulated, so the bean you grow in your garden is the same as the original cultivar. They are versatile, use them as a snap bean, or as a dry bean. I chose to let them dry on the plant, and I’m glad I did.

I made a pot of soup today with the dry beans, and for me, they are the best tasting beans I’ve ever had. Slightly sweet and nutty with a creamy texture, they had a unique flavor that transcends any bean flavor I’ve ever had. I like beans, so I’ve sample a good number of varieties. I did sample a few fresh off the plant in the garden, and they weren’t much different from a fresh string bean. In my experience, they are a bean well worth drying.

The plants are compact and I was quite satisfied with the yield. I’m glad I didn’t plan my garden before I had the soup. I might have overlooked these tasty morsels. They will be my bean of choice until further notice.

 

January 12, 2013
by Jeff Quattrone
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Rat Tail Radish

Sorry, I don’t have a photo for this heirloom variety yet. You can find one here, along with a seed source. Hoover your mouse over the thumbnail and you can see a larger photo.

I like radishes, and until a couple of years ago all I knew were the small, vibrant red, pungent, crunchy balls of flavor. Once korean cuisines entered the trendy foodie scene, the Daikon radish appeared. These large, white cylindrical shaped roots challenged what I knew and thought a radish was. Once the fascination starts, the researcher and historian kicks in, and all of sudden I have a new subject matter to explore, which makes me happy.

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January 6, 2013
by Jeff Quattrone
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Organic Heirloom Seeds 2013

Photo of silver edge squash seed
Seed catalogues came early this year, which was a nice surprise. I like the printed catalogs. They’re like story books to me. As I sit and read, my mind fills with wonder. I’m taken to a world filled with color, texture and taste. Thoughts of perfect rows, sun drenched days where pollinators play all day inspire me to order a spectrum of delights for my soul.

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January 1, 2013
by Jeff Quattrone
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0123, Box It…

sunflower seeds… and you get 2013 in lottery parlance. Happy New Year! 2012 was quite a year here at Vanishingfeast.com. The travelling I did in 2012 to find my voice, and to build an audience, opened up so many possibilities. I’m overwhelmed really. The future looks good.

For example, I have my first book signing on January 31, 2013. It will be at a local library. I will give a talk before the signing, and the subject will be pure seeds, and their value in the heirloom gardening and food movement. More details to come about this.

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December 16, 2012
by Jeff Quattrone
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Perhaps A Tomato Variety of My Very Own

Tomato photo

Accidents happen in the life, and when your garden is your life, accidents happen there too. For example, mixing up the Aunt Ruby’s German Greens with the Pineapples, cutting the main stem of a plant and not the branch, and stepping on a tray of seedlings. Just a few select examples of my accidents.

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December 9, 2012
by Jeff Quattrone
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In Her Own Words, Why a Social Business

photo jars of foodI’m pleased to have Anea Botton, founder of Valley Girls Foodstuffs as a guest blogger today. Welcome, Anea!

I met Anea at The 2nd Annual National Heirloom Festival where we both were vendors. I loved her red glasses, her brand image, and once I got to know her and the folks from Valley Girls Foodstuffs, I was very impressed with them and their mission. Since the expos, a lot of great things are happening for them, and I’m sure there will be more updates as they grow.

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December 2, 2012
by Jeff Quattrone
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¡TIERRA!, Lavazza’s Responsible Choice, Part 3

screen shot photograph lavazza good karm good coffee

In the first two parts of this series, I wrote about the choices that business owners make in running their business. In part 1, I contrasted the choice of greed versus social responsibility, in part 2, I wrote about ¡TIERRA!, a project by Lavazza coffee to create sustainable and autonomous coffee growing communities in six countries on three continents, and today, I’m going to write about the roundtable I attended that inspired this series.

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November 25, 2012
by Jeff Quattrone
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¡TIERRA!, Lavazza’s Responsible Choice, Part 2

photo coffee can
In my previous post, I contrasted the sustainable and socially responsible choice that Luiggi Lavazza made in 1935 to change his business vision, with the choice of greed that some American corporations indicated they will make in 2014 when a new health care law goes into effect.

From Lavazza’s Code of Ethics page (yes, a stated code of ethics) on their website:

The Lavazza Group has always been committed to observing all legislation applicable to the various business units, in the firm belief that the way in which business is conducted is just as important as the profits achieved and that nobody should operate under the false assumption that business targets are more important than legal and ethical standards.

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November 18, 2012
by Jeff Quattrone
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¡TIERRA!, Lavazza’s Responsible Choice, Part 1

screen shot photograph lavazza good karm good coffee

“I don’t want to be part of a world that destroys Nature’s treasures.” – Luigi Lavazza

 

 

 

 It was during a trip to South America in 1935 when Luigi Lavazza expressed his dismay at the destruction of whole batches of unsold coffee — an experience that left its mark on him, and changed his business vision.

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November 12, 2012
by Jeff Quattrone
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On Being Challenged

A lot of what I write about here is about looking at your life as a story you write everyday. One example I use is to look at the challenges that arise in your life as plot twists, since that’s where the magic happens. They provide that rich and unexpected content that makes your story truly your own. These challenges add depth to any story, and they open up story lines and character development better than anything planned. It’s a great concept, and this unexpected delay in Italy for a week is exactly the type of opportunity I always refer to.  Be careful what you wish for could apply here. It will take a long to process all of this, and to pay for it, and in the week that I’ve been back, I have had little time to figure any of it out.

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